ACA enrollment data: Details matter

By: Meg Booth

The Children’s Dental Health Project (CDHP) has joined more than 300 organizations asking the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to release disaggregated data on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) enrollment by race, ethnicity, primary language and disability status. The sign-on letter, coordinated by the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum and the Morehouse School of Medicine, described how these data are needed in order to assist organizations and government agencies to more effectively design, evaluate and improve strategies to reach and enroll all communities during the next open enrollment period.

The letter highlights the potential for the ACA to make significant improvements in health disparities by enrolling underserved population in health insurance programs.

In fact, eight out of ten uninsured Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, eight in ten eligible Latinos, and six in ten African Americans may be eligible for coverage through the state marketplaces (exchanges), Medicaid or CHIP. Additionally, people with disabilities cross all communities of color, but gaps in health insurance coverage remain and enrollment efforts to all of these populations present unique challenges.

. . . a more complete picture of children who have enrolled would help better identify strategies to provide information that assists families making coverage decisions.

Given the options of dental coverage in marketplaces, a more complete picture of children who have enrolled would help better identify strategies to provide information that assists families making coverage decisions.  The letter is part of a broader effort by CDHP and other organizations dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved communities to ensure that future open enrollment periods are successful.

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Did you know?

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Children with poor oral health were nearly 3x more likely to miss school due to dental pain.
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